Course DescriptionsEngl 100: Exposition and ArgumentEngl 101: English for International StudentsEngl 200: Literary StudiesEnglish 200: Literary Studies--Language, Form, InspirationEnglish 200: Literary Studies--Crime FictionEnglish 200: Literary Studies--Utopian/ Dystopian LiteratureEnglish 200: Literary Studies--Into the WildEnglish 200: Literary Studies--Banned Books and Novel IdeasEnglish 200: Literary Studies--Horrible Husbands and Wicked WivesEnglish 200: Literary Studies--Innocence and ExperienceEngl 231: Film AestheticsEngl 300: Introduction to Professional WritingEngl 301: Introduction to Creative WritingEngl 310: Introduction to Technical WritingEngl 321: Intermediate CompositionEngl 365/565*: Studies in American LiteratureEngl 380/ 580*: Topics in WritingEngl 386: Internship in EnglishEngl 389: Teaching English to Speakers of Other LanguagesEngl 390/590: Topics in LiteratureEngl 396/596: Traditions of Giving and Serving in American LifeEngl 400: New Literacies, Cultures, and Technologies of WritingEngl 401: American Literature 1English 402: American Literature 2Engl 405/505*: Masterpieces of World LiteratureEngl 408/508: Methods of Literary Criticism and ResearchEngl 409/509: Literature of the Medieval PeriodEngl 410/510: ShakespeareEngl 420/520: Literature of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth CenturiesEngl 423: Short Story WritingEngl 424: Poetry WritingEngl 425: Creative NonfictionEngl 430/530: Literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth CenturyEng 431: Advanced CompositionEngl 441/541: History of the English LanguageEngl 442/542: Modern English GrammarEngl 443/543: Introduction to LinguisticsEngl 450/550: British Literature of the Nineteenth CenturyEngl 456: The NovelEngl 460/560: Twentieth-Century DramaEngl 470/570: Twentieth-Century FictionEngl 475/575: Twentieth Century PoetryEngl 478: Literature for ChildrenEngl 479/ 579: Literature for AdolescentsEngl 481: Cooperative Education in English 1Engl 482-483: Cooperative Education in English II-IIIEngl 489: The Teaching of EnglishEngl 491: Seminar in Professional WritingEngl 492: Seminar in WritingEngl 493: Seminar in EnglishEngl 495*: Independent Study in EnglishEngl 497: Honors Work in EnglishEngl 498: Honors Candicacy in EnglishEngl 609: Theory and Practice of Expository WritingLS 610: Seminar in HumanitiesEnglish 610: Studies in Nineteenth-Century British LiteratureEngl 615: Shakespeare and His ContemporariesEngl 635: Studies in American Literature
ENGLISH 321: INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION

Cr. 3

Schuette-Hoffman: Many young writers are given the advice, "Write what you know." While this is undoubtedly sound advice, one of the most powerful aspects of writing is how it can help you discover what you do not yet know. In this course, we will do both. We will begin with the familiar and move out, through research methods, toward the not yet known.

I’ve loosely divided the class into two components—experience and social discourse. While these two components are ultimately inseparable, the focus on one and then the other allows us to explore different kinds of composition. The first writing assignments will ask you to reflect on the nitty-gritty details of lived experience (through examining education and then identity) while the last two writing assignments will ask you to enter the ongoing public conversation about some contemporary issue. Narrative will help you negotiate the first assignments; the essay will help you with the latter. This does not mean ideas are absent from narrative nor that story is absent from the essay—in fact you will be attempting both—but the emphasis of each will be different.

Writing is both an art and a skill. Art requires imagination and can be approached through exercises (for example, free writing). Skill requires knowledge of conventions and can be approached through strategies (for example, grammar and style). Both art and skill improve with practice. This class is designed to give you practice.