A major in computer science may be pursued as either a bachelor of science or a bachelor of arts, depending on the student’s interests and complementary major or minor. The B.A. requires a minimum of 32 credit hours in computer science; the B.S. requires at least 36 credit hours in computer science.

In both programs, students learn computational reasoning through courses that introduce algorithms via modern programming languages and environments. A required seminar in professional practices focuses on communication and interpersonal skills as well as social, ethical, and legal issues associated with modern computational technologies.

Learning Objectives for CS Majors

Students will:

  • demonstrate expertise in the development and design of software
  • have a working knowledge of the theoretical foundations of the discipline
  • demonstrate the ability to communicate computer science-related topics in written and oral form
  • be informed, educated citizens in terms of the social and ethical implications of the use of computer technology
  • be provided with an up-to-date understanding of the field
  • have foundational experiences in a number of sub-areas of computer science
  • utilize their computer science education in either their careers or in the pursuit of graduate work

Degree Requirements

Foundations

Students in computer science at Valpo must complete the general-education requirements for the undergraduate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. This University-wide core strengthens communication and critical thinking skills while introducing the student to global cultures and traditions. All majors in the College of Arts and Sciences complete at least 124 total credits to earn a bachelor’s degree.

CAS General-Education Requirements for the B.A. »
CAS General-Education Requirements for the B.S. »

Professional Practices Seminar

Seniors in computer science at Valpo take the department’s seminar in professional practices, an invaluable step in preparing budding programmers for a variety of work environments. In this course, students and faculty discuss professionalism and ethical responsibilities in software development and human-computer interaction and explore laws, risks, liabilities, codes of ethics, privacy, international and gender issues, philosophical frameworks, and ethical implications of computing practices. Students also learn and develop interpersonal, communication, and presentation skills.

Courses Required for the Major

Course Title Credits
Core Courses 8
CS 157 Algorithms and Programming 3
CS 158 Algorithms and Abstract Data Types 3
CS 493 Seminar in Professional Practices 2
Electives 24
At least 12 credits must be from computer science courses numbered 300 or above.
Remaining credits must be from computer science courses numbered 200 or above.
TOTAL 32
Additional Required Courses
MATH 131 Calculus I 4
MATH 220 Discrete Mathematics 3
STAT 240 Statistical Analysis 3

Course Title Credits
Core Courses 11
CS 157 Algorithms and Programming 3
CS 158 Algorithms and Abstract Data Types 3
CS 250 Object Oriented Programming 3
CS 493 Seminar in Professional Practices 2
At least one of the following: 4
CS 358 Software Design and Development 4
CS 372 Computability and Computational Complexity 4
Electives 21
At least 12 credits must be from computer science courses numbered 300 or above.
Remaining credits must be from computer science courses numbered 200 or above.
TOTAL 36
Additional Required Courses
MATH 131 Calculus I 4
MATH 220 Discrete Mathematics 3
STAT 240 Statistical Analysis 3

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Areas of Focus

The department has developed recommended programs of study appropriate for students who are interested in the following fields:

  • Graduate study in computer science
  • Software development
  • Computer hardware

Areas of Focus »