01A-Mission-and-Vision

Liturgies

Worship at the Institute of Liturgical Studies 

For more than seventy years, the Institute of Liturgical Studies has served as a gathering place for church leaders, congregations, scholars, and ecumenical partners who help to steward and enrich the church’s liturgy and song. Texts, melodies, translations, and other settings commissioned by the Institute or crafted for its liturgies have, over time, appeared in several congregational resources.

Worship at the Institute begins and ends with the celebration of the eucharist, and ancient patterns of the daily office are reflected in other services of morning, midday, and evening prayer according to each year’s theme. Liturgies use worship books found in Chapel of the Resurrection: Evangelical Lutheran Worship, the cranberry book, is indicated in bulletins as ELW, and Lutheran Service Book, the brown book, is abbreviated as LSB. Though rooted in its Lutheran identity and heritage, the Institute establishes links with other centers for liturgical renewal that inform and shape corporate worship across an ecumenically diverse array of styles, resources, traditions, and more.

If you would like to know more about the texts, music, and resources used in this year’s liturgies, please browse the sections below.

2022 Offerings

All offerings collected at this year’s Institute will be shared with the annual World Relief Campaign of the Social Action Leadership Team (SALT), the social justice ministry of the Chapel of the Resurrection at Valparaiso University. Known as “HOPE in Honduras: Healthcare Opportunities for Personal Empowerment,” this year’s campaign seeks to provide two fully functioning health clinics in the La Coroza and Remolino communities. Offerings for the project will be used for construction, furnishings, medical supplies, and dental supplies. To give electronically, scan the code provided in the bulletins for the gathering and sending eucharists bulletins or visit the World Relief Campaign website above. Baskets will be placed in the Chapel of the Resurrection to collect offerings made with cash or by checks payable to “World Relief Campaign.”

2022 Art and Worship Space

Stations of the Cross and Resurrection

Installed in the nave of Valparaiso University’s Chapel of the Resurrection, the Institute’s 2022 liturgical commission by artist Mary Button pairs moments in the Passion story with Jesus’s post-resurrection ministry. The Stations of the Cross depict moments of chaos and crisis during the past months of pandemic life while the Stations of the Resurrection depict moments of community and catharsis. The intent of the series is to encourage people to pray the stations in pairs: chaos and catharsis, grief and joy, Kyrie and Gloria, cross and resurrection.

Stations of Kyrie and Gloria

At any time during the Institute and its liturgies, you are invited to visit additional stations to voice your own Kyries and Glorias—griefs, losses, experiences of suffering, and joys, blessings, causes for praise. A “Kyrie station” is located at the north end (the Harre Union side) of the worship space, and the “Gloria station” is at the south end (the Helge Center side). Use the provided fabric pens to write or draw on the strips of fabric and ribbons. Offerings of Kyrie and Gloria from both stations will be gathered into processional banners for the Institute’s closing eucharist.

2022 Schola

Each year, liturgies at the Institute are supported and led by a schola cantorum of both singers and instrumentalists. Members of the Schola receive music in advance and rehearse anthems and liturgical music between seminars, workshops, and other events. This year, in lieu of preparing anthems, the Schola is intentionally modeling the many ways in which choirs and smaller groups can lead and enrich assembly song. In addition, many Schola members are participating in the 2022 David G. Truemper Memorial Concert as part of the Elm Ensemble. We gratefully acknowledge the time, gifts, and leadership of:

Dcn. Jennifer Baker-Trinity • Rev. Nathan Baker-TrinityKelly BoieCelia BridgesJonathan Ten Brink • Rev. Annemarie Hartner CookNate Crary • Rev. Elizabeth Damico-CarperPaul Damico-CarperDaniel J. Fenn • Rev. Erica Gibson-EvenJulie GrindleSarah Hanson • Rev. Dr. Joshua HollmannAdam Lefever HughesHelen JohannesenChristine LaughlinJoshua MessnerSally Messner, Schola director Stephanie Sepiol MilneMark MummertOmaldo PerezLaura PotratzKraig Salvesen • Rebekah Schulz • Rev. Marissa SotosDenita StrietelmeierBecky SwansonKatherine TegtmeierLuke TegtmeierNicole Warner

2022 Lectionary Notes

Gathering Eucharist (Monday)

This liturgy uses most of the Revised Common Lectionary readings for the commemoration of Mark, Evangelist. Though not numbered among the twelve apostles, Mark was probably a member of the early church community. The gospel that bears his name is the shortest and most direct, and many scholars think it was the first to be written. Instead of the passage from 2 Timothy, the second reading from 1 Peter was chosen to align with the overall conference theme of Kyries and Glorias. This latter passage holds suffering and fiery ordeals together with a spirit of rejoicing.

Daily Prayer (Tuesday)

Rather than focus entire liturgies on either lament or praise, aspects of Kyrie and Gloria are held in tension throughout the Institute. The passages selected for daily prayer across Tuesday’s morning, midday, and evening liturgies reflect this spectrum. At morning prayer, the passage from Jeremiah contains both merriment and dance, and Rachel weeps for her children. At midday prayer, the reading from Joel reflects weeping and mourning for sin, while Philippians invites rejoicing and contentment in times of plenty and need. And at evening prayer, the vision from Revelation names the saints who have come out of the great ordeal and includes one of the great hymns of Holy Scripture, the basis for the well-known canticle “Worthy is Christ.”

Eucaristía de Salida • Sending Eucharist (Wednesday)

This liturgy uses most of the Revised Common Lectionary readings for the Third Sunday of Easter in Year C. Instead of the passage from Acts, the first reading from Isaiah 12—a song of deliverance—reflects the comfort and joy we have experienced during the pandemic. It leads beautifully to Psalm 30 and the beloved verse: “Weeping spends the night, but joy comes in the morning” (Psalm 30:5). During this liturgy, the presider will freely alternate between the English and Spanish texts included in the bulletin. All are welcome to speak or sing assembly responses in any language. Translations of texts and rubrics have been reprinted or adapted from Libro de Liturgia y Cántico (1998) and All Creation Sings (2020), and some have been newly translated for this year’s Institute.

2022 Sources and Acknowledgements

Unless otherwise indicated, Institute liturgies are adapted or reprinted from Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), Lutheran Service Book (2006), All Creation Sings (2020), and SundaysandSeasons.com, with copyrights held or administered by Augsburg Fortress and Concordia Publishing House. Texts and music reprinted under Augsburg Fortress Liturgies Annual License 27002 and One License A-702845.

Additional resources printed in this year’s bulletins are listed in the sections below, and several items will be available for download and local use following the Institute.

As the Shadows Lengthen. Eucharistic prayer reprinted from All Creation Sings: Holy Communion, Setting 12.

Be Known to Us, Lord Jesus. Text: Traditional fraction anthem, adapt. from Luke 24:35. Music: Anne Krentz Organ, b. 1960, © 2020 Augsburg Fortress. Reprinted from All Creation Sings: Holy Communion, Setting 12. Commissioned for the 2019 Institute of Liturgical Studies.

Beloved of God. Invitation to the table by Steven Wilco, 2021.

Glory to God. Text: Tradition Gloria, adapt. from Luke 2:14. Music: Peruvian traditional. Reprinted from All Creation Sings: Holy Communion, Setting 11.

Holy, Holy, Holy. Text: Traditional Sanctus, adapt. from Isaiah 6:3 and Matthew 21:9. Music: Anne Krentz Organ, b. 1960, © 2020 Augsburg Fortress. Reprinted from All Creation Sings: Holy Communion, Setting 12.

I Rest in the Shadow of Your Wings. Text: Psalm 57:1–3, 9–10, reprinted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship. Music: Julie Howard and Vera Lyons, © 1992 Liturgical Press. Setting reprinted from Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship, page 365.

Kyrie Eleison. Text: Steven Wilco, 2021. Music: Chad Fothergill, 2021. Written and composed for this liturgy, the setting will be made available for download and local use following the Institute.

Love Leads Us Through the Wind and Waves. Text: Jeannette M. Lindholm, b. 1961, © 2021 Jeannette M. Lindholm, admin. Augsburg Fortress. Music, HEALING PROMISE: Robert Buckley Farlee, b. 1950, © 2021 Robert Buckley Farlee, admin. Augsburg Fortress. Commissioned for the 2022 Institute of Liturgical Studies as part of the annual Christus Rex Hymn Commission series.

Nothing in All Creation. Text: Romans 8:39. Music: Anne Krentz Organ, b. 1960, © 2020 Augsburg Fortress. Reprinted from All Creation Sings: Holy Communion, Setting 12.

Prayer Petitions. Crafted for this liturgy by Annemarie H. Cook, 2021. The petitions will be made available for download and local use following the Institute.

You, Lord, Are Both Lamb and Shepherd. Text: Sylvia G. Dunstan, 1955–1993, © 1991 GIA Publications, Inc. Music, PICARDY: French folk tune, 17th cent. Reprinted from All Creation Sings, Hymn 954.

Sometimes Our Only Song Is Weeping. Text: Adam M. L. Tice, b. 1979, © 2015 GIA Publications, Inc. Music, WAYFARING STRANGER: North American traditional. Reprinted from All Creation Sings, Hymn 1050.

We Do Not Know How to Pray … with Sighs Too Deep. Text: Romans 8:26, alt. Music: Anne Krentz Organ, b. 1960. This setting is part of “Sighs Too Deep for Words,” an expansive-language liturgy project of several congregations in the greater Twin Cities area that will be discussed in a 2022 Institute workshop.

Prayer Petitions. The prayers have been adapted from the “Prayer of Lament” in All Creation Sings, page 61.

Confession. Text from Cláudio Carvalhaes, Liturgies from Below: Praying with People at the Ends of the World, page 75.

Love Leads Us Through the Wind and Waves. Text: Jeannette M. Lindholm, b. 1961, © 2021 Jeannette M. Lindholm, admin. Augsburg Fortress. Music, HEALING PROMISE: Robert Buckley Farlee, b. 1950, © 2021 Robert Buckley Farlee, admin. Augsburg Fortress. Commissioned for the 2022 Institute of Liturgical Studies as part of the annual Christus Rex Hymn Commission series.

God of Hope, You Call Us Home. Collect for Third Sunday of Advent, Year C. Reprinted from the online Revised Common Lectionary resource, a project of the Vanderbilt Divinity Library.

O God, Where Hearts Are Fearful and Constricted. Collect for times of conflict, crisis, disaster. Reprinted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship, page 76. 

O Living Water, Refresh My Soul. Text and music: Rosalie Vissing. Reprinted from Agape: Songs of Hope and Reconciliation, Song 67.

Lord, Have Mercy. Setting by Aaron David Miller. Reprinted from Hear Our Prayer: Prayer Responses for Choir and Assembly. Prayer petitions by Liv Larson Andrews will be made available for download and local use following the Institute.

My Soul Magnifies the Lord. Text, Magnificat: Henry W. Kiley, based on Luke 1:47–55. Music: Henry W. Kiley. Text and music © Henry W. Kiley, admin. Christian Conference of Asia. Reprinted from Sound the Bamboo, Hymn 102.

Overtones. Reflection by Susan Palo Cherwien, 1953–2021. Published in From Glory into Glory: Reflections for Worship, page 38.

Alleluia … Breathe, O Breathe. Text: Ezekiel 37:9. Music: Anne Krentz Organ, b. 1960. This setting is part of “Sighs Too Deep for Words,” an expansive-language liturgy project of several congregations in the greater Twin Cities area that will be discussed in a 2022 Institute workshop.

Cordero de Dios (O Lamb of God). Text: Traditional Agnus Dei, adapt. from John 1:29. Music: Victor Jortack, b. 1952. Reprinted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship: Holy Communion, Setting 7, © 1998, 2006 Augsburg Fortress.

El Señor sea con ustedes (The Lord be with you). Text: Traditional Sursum corda. Bilingual setting crafted for the 2020 Institute of Liturgical Studies by Felix Malpica and Chad Fothergill.

Eucharistic Prayer. Reprinted from Samuel Wells and Abigail Kocher, Eucharistic Prayers, page 162. Translated for the 2022 Institute of Liturgical Studies by Omaldo Perez.

Glory to God in the Highest. Text: Traditional Gloria, adapt. from Luke 2:14. Music: Dennis Friesen-Carper, b. 1953. Reprinted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship: Holy Communion, Setting 8, © 2006 Augsburg Fortress.

Jesus Calls Us. From James Clemens and David Wright, A Field of Voices: Hymns for Worship.

Lord, Have Mercy. Setting: Roger Wesby, unpublished. Permission granted for use at the 2022 Institute of Liturgical Studies.

Nimemwona Bwana (We Have Seen the Lord). Text: Tanzanian traditional, transl. Jeff Sartain, b. 1962. Music: Tanzanian tune, arr. Mark Sedio, b. 1954. Text and arr. © 2003 Concordia Publishing House. Reprinted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship, Hymn 869.

O choro pode durar (Through Weeping and Deepest Sorrow). Text (Psalm 30) and music: Simei Monteiro, © 2000 Simei Monteiro. Setting reprinted from Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship, page 194.

Oh, That I Had a Thousand Voices. The introduction is adapted from a published setting by Paul O. Manz, 1919–2009, © 1970, 1992, and 2011 Birnamwood Publications.

Santo, Santo (Holy, Holy). Text: Guillermo Cuéllar, b. 1955, trans. Linda McCrae. Music, CUÉLLAR: Guillermo Cuéllar. Text and music © 1993, 1994 GIA Publications, Inc. Reprinted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship, Hymn 762.

Sing, Praise, and Bless the Lord. Text: Taizé Community. Music: Jacques Berthier, 1923–1994, and Taizé Community, © 1998 Ateliers et Presses de Taizé.

Touch That Soothes and Heals. Text: Mary Louise Bringle, b. 1953, © 2002 GIA Publications, Inc. Music, CIVILITY: Gregg DeMey, b. 1972, © 2008 Re:Create Music, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources. Reprinted from All Creation Sings, Hymn 939. Instrumental descants composed for the 2022 Institute of Liturgical Studies by Anne Krentz Organ.

Planning Institute Liturgies

The planning process unfolds across several months. Members of the Institute’s advisory council consider several lectionary options that engage the theme. After a provisional lectionary is compiled, the advisory council carefully attends to aspects of pattern (ordo), ritual, translation, language, and music. Planners simultaneously attend to complex questions: When should we model how to lead familiar things well? What new ideas or resources can sustain or inspire weary leaders? What is unique to the Institute’s space and the ability of the many pastors and musicians in attendance? What can be easily adapted in a variety of local contexts? Through continued conversation with presenters and worship leaders, plans are adapted and revised—sometimes reimagined in response to local, national, and international circumstances.

Questions

If you would like to know more about any of the information or resources on this page (or to supply clarifications or corrections to listed sources), please contact us.